Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Blog

Approachable health tips from the personal trainers of TorqueStrong

Should You Cook Your Tomatoes? ~Nutrtition Nuggets~

Alydia Bryant

Many of us have head that its better to eat our veggies raw or al dente because the process of cooking decreases the nutrient value of fruits and veggies. I recently started taking a nutrition course and learned that thats not always the case. Over the next few months I'm going to be sharing these little nutrition facts that I'm learning through a blog series called ~Nutrition Nuggets~. Today we are going to take a look at the advantages of cooking Tomatoes.

35% of deaths due to cancer in the United States are related to diet. Food is our lively hood. The foods we eat either make us healthier or less healthy. By making simple changes to the foods we consume we can drastically improve our over all health. Raw Tomatoes contain a higher amount of Vitamin C, But Cooked Tomatoes contain more Lycopene.

Did you know that tomatoes contain important anti-inflammatory nutrients called carotenoids and bioflavonoids.

Key tomato carotenoids are:

  • beta-carotene, an orange pigment also found in carrots and sweet potatoes, an important antioxidant that can help to protect against damage from sunlight. Your body also converts beta-carotene into vitamin A.
  • lycopene, a red pigment, with demonstrated anti-cancer effects. In Western countries, 85 percent of dietary lycopene can be attributed to the consumption of tomato-based products.
  • phytoene and phytofluene, anti-cancer compounds in tomatoes.

Studies indicate that tomato consumption is associated with a potentially reduced risk of:

  • ovarian cancer, especially in premenopausal women. 
  • digestive tract cancers (mouth, throat, esophagus, pancreas, colon and rectum).
  • cardiovascular disease.
  • asthma and chronic lung disease.
  • prostate cancer

Tomatoes And Prostate Cancer

American men who eat four-ten servings of tomato products per week have, 18-40 percent reduction in the risk of prostate cancer. Studies of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer found that increasing consumption of tomato products was associated with a marked decrease in cancer progression. In one study, when men with prostate cancer ate three-quarters of a cup of tomato sauce a day, cooked in various dishes, evidence of cancer regression could be detected in only three weeks for the men in the study. One theory as to the benefit for prostate cancer is due to lycopene.

Lycopene: The cooking process brings out more of the lycopene in tomatoes. Most lycopene is located in the outer pericarp and the skin attached to the insoluble fiber portion of the tomatoes. Thermal processing (cooking) disrupts the cell membranes and cell walls and releases lycopene from the insoluble portion of the tomatoes, which increases the pool of bioaccessible lycopene and improves lycopene absorption.

Eat cooked tomatoes with a small amount of food that contains fat, such as olive oil. Fat helps your body absorb the lycopene and antioxidants in cooked tomatoes. One drawback to canned or jarred tomato products is that they often contain large amounts of added sodium. Too much sodium can contribute to heart disease and stroke. Make your own cooked tomatoes or buy low-sodium versions to make them more nutritious.

I LOVE tomatoes cooked and uncooked! Here are two of my favorite ways to enjoy them! If you are interested in learning more about developing a balanced nutrition plan or beginning an exercise program email Alydia Today! alydia@torquestrong.com.
 

Ancient Harvest Quinoa Pasta, Spaghetti, 8 Ounce 4 garlic cloves, minced 1 (8 ounce) fresh sliced mushrooms 1 (28 ounce) can organic salt free crushed tomatoes 1 dicedonion 1 (6 ounce) can organic salt free Italian-style tomato paste 2 teaspoons dried oregano 2 teaspoons dried basil 1 teaspoon sea salt 1⁄2 teaspoon pepper      Combine ground beef, onion, garlic, mushrooms and green pepper in a large saucepan. Cook and stir until meat is brown and vegetables are tender. Drain grease. 2. Stir diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, and tomato paste into the pan. Season with oregano, basil, salt, and pepper. Simmer spaghetti sauce, stirring occasionally.

Ancient Harvest Quinoa Pasta, Spaghetti, 8 Ounce
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 (8 ounce) fresh sliced mushrooms
1 (28 ounce) can organic salt free crushed tomatoes
1 dicedonion
1 (6 ounce) can organic salt free Italian-style tomato paste
2 teaspoons dried oregano
2 teaspoons dried basil
1 teaspoon sea salt
1⁄2 teaspoon pepper

 

Combine ground beef, onion, garlic, mushrooms and green pepper in a large saucepan. Cook and stir until meat is brown and vegetables are tender. Drain grease.
2. Stir diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, and tomato paste into the pan. Season with oregano, basil, salt, and pepper. Simmer spaghetti sauce, stirring occasionally.

3 vine-ripe tomatoes, 1/4-inch thick slices 1 pound fresh mozzarella, 1/4-inch thick slices 10 to 20 leaves (about 1 bunch) fresh basil Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling Balsamic Vinegar, for drizzling Coarse salt and pepper   Layer alternating slices of tomatoes and mozzarella, adding a basil leaf between each, on a large, shallow platter. Drizzle the salad with extra-virgin olive oil, Balsamic Vinegar, and season with salt and pepper, to taste.      


3 vine-ripe tomatoes, 1/4-inch thick slices
1 pound fresh mozzarella, 1/4-inch thick slices
10 to 20 leaves (about 1 bunch) fresh basil
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
Balsamic Vinegar, for drizzling
Coarse salt and pepper


Layer alternating slices of tomatoes and mozzarella, adding a basil leaf between each, on a large, shallow platter. Drizzle the salad with extra-virgin olive oil, Balsamic Vinegar, and season with salt and pepper, to taste.